THE RIGHT COLOURS TO WEAR FOR YOUR SKIN TONE

Colour can be a cruel mistress. Most of us know that we could stand to win a few style points by giving hues outside our comfort zone a go, but — like finding the right haircut for your face shape — selecting hues that work with your complexion is often easier said than done.

With such a kaleidoscopic spectrum of shades on offer, it’s no wonder you’re probably scratching your head and wondering ‘what colors should I wear?’. Now, some of you are bound to disagree, saying it’s not exactly rocket science, but simply a matter of trying something on and sizing it up in a changing room mirror before you buy. And to an extent, you’re right.

But if you want to shave some time off your shopping rounds or buy more confidently online, then it’s worth acquainting yourself with a few fundamental rules when it comes to knowing the tones that are sure to complement you.

WHAT COLORS SHOULD I WEAR?

The first step to this daunting question of what colors should I wear is to delete the bookmarks you made for those online quizzes based on supposedly sophisticated algorithms. And scrap those guides that think they’re doing you a favour by labelling you with a season (seriously, WTF?). These might be fine for a little light entertainment, but knowing your skin is ‘winter’ isn’t all that useful when it comes to taking action.

Secondly, take a look at your forearm. To best judge which colours should form the core of your wardrobe, you’ll need to determine whether your skin is pale, medium/olive, or dark. Once that’s out of the way, read on for a blow-by-blow guide to finding the colours that work for you.

FAIR/PALE SKIN

Find yourself constantly looking for somewhere to shade from the summer sun? More freckles than a speckled goose egg? Or, at the very least have red, blonde or light brown hair? Chances are you’re the proud owner of a milky pallor.

COLOURS TO WEAR

If you’ve got pale skin and light features, then hues that clearly contrast with your skin tone will — quite literally — bring some colour to your complexion. “I’d recommend basing your outfit around darker colours, which you can combine with lighter colours,” says Selfridges personal shopper and stylist Daniel Rhone.

Darker colours like grey, brown, burgundy, bottle green, navy and bolder shades of blue will all work well as these shades contrast with your skin tone.

COLOURS TO AVOID

Given that, in the wrong lighting at least, you could be mistaken for a cadaver, you’ll want to avoid soft, pastel shades or bright colours as these will only wash you out further. The same goes for neutrals too; so rather than white, light beige or stone, choose richer shades such as sand, camel, khaki and slate grey.

“This doesn’t mean you can’t express yourself through colour. It just means you have to mix light colours with dark ones,” adds Rhone. Red, though not best suited to the ruddier, rosy-cheeked pale person, can work for more alabaster pale skin tones when worn in bold shades like crimson.

OUTFIT INSPIRATION

The right colours to wear if you're pale or light skinned

OLIVE/MEDIUM SKIN

If you’ve got olive-toned skin that tends to tan rather than toast in the sun, then you have what’s known as a ‘warm’ complexion, which suits a much wider spectrum of colours than those with fair skin or ‘cool’ complexions.

COLOURS TO WEAR

While most colours will work with a medium skin tone, you can ensure you look your best by opting for shades that are either a little brighter or darker than the middle ground. What does that mean exactly? Choose pale beige rather than warm sand if you’re opting for light neutrals, or try a bolder shade of purple (such as magenta) rather than mauve, for example.

“I’d recommend a lighter colour palette, with white being the obvious choice to accentuate your skin tone,” says Rhone. It’s good news, then, that the stark shade is no longer limited to linen. Outside of the sunny season, try a pair of white jeans with a dark jacket for a standout look.

COLOURS TO AVOID

Since your skin will likely have yellow or green undertones, it’s wise to avoid wearing shades of these colours that are too close to your skin tone. What you’re trying to avoid here is ending up looking nude i.e. having your skin blend in with your clothing.

Hues you should probably give the heave-ho include pistachio, mustard, olive and mocha brown. For trickier looks like all-white or pastels-on-pastels, make sure you’re tanned enough (closer to black rather than green olive, if you will) to carry it off without looking washed out.

OUTFIT INSPIRATION

The right colours to wear if you have olive or medium skin tones

DARKER SKIN

Much like those with medium skin, when it comes to finding colours that suit you, guys with darker skin have won the genetic lottery and can try their hand at pretty much any hue without much need for trepidation.

COLOURS TO WEAR

The world, gentlemen, truly is your oyster. The colour of your skin is perfectly positioned to marry well with the vast majority of hues and shades, as it doesn’t run the risk of being washed out like comparatively pale skin tones. With that said, there are a couple of caveats.

“Having a licence to wear bold, bright colours like jade green or cobalt blue is great, but be mindful of adding balance to your outfit with a colour that will hold the look together,” advises Rhone. In practice, that means not spinning the colour wheel like a mad decorator who just spent half an hour huffing chemicals in a paint shop, but choosing a single pop of colour or two that complement rather than compete with each other.

COLOURS TO AVOID

Brown is pretty much a no-go. Much like how pastel shades wash out paler skin tones, brown won’t contrast clearly enough with your skin, resulting in your look ‘bleeding’ into your skin. While black and navy are two key colours in any man’s wardrobe (making up the majority of formal and corporate wear), it’s worth keeping these to a minimum to really make the most of your especially versatile skin tone.

“Personally, I don’t subscribe to a colour chart that dictates how you should dress based on your skin tone,” says Rhone. “Style is, and always has been, about self-expression, and I always advise my clients that if there is a colour you like, go and wear it with confidence. That said, it’s worth being mindful of colours that work together.”

OUTFIT INSPIRATION

The right colours to wear if you're black or dark skinned

Source: Fashion Beans

One-third of Vietnam’s clothing factories reportedly closed due to Covid

Around a third of Vietnam’s textile and garment factories have reportedly halted operations following a surge in cases of Covid-19 in the Southeast Asian country. About 30 to 35 percent of textile and garment factories in Vietnam are currently closed, the Business of Fashion reports, citing figures from the Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (VITAS).

The country plays a key role in the world’s fashion industry. According to the World Trade Statistical Review 2021 published in July by the World Trade Organization (WTO), it overtook Bangladesh as the world’s second-largest exporter of ready-made garments.

Vietnam’s clothing exports grew 6.4 percent in 2020 with a market value of 29 billion dollars. The country has been hit hard in the past two months by the pandemic, prior to which it was largely successful in keeping infection numbers low. New cases are now trending at around 7,000 and 8,000 each day.

Vaccination rates among textile workers in the country are still very low, according to VITAS.

Source: Fashion United

Afterpay and New York Fashion Week announce NYFW Unlocked schedule

Payment technology company Afterpay has announced its New York Fashion Week events calendar, bringing a new world of accessibility for consumers nationwide.

Over the course of this NYFW season, Afterpay will be host to a number of online and offline activities that allow viewers and consumers to interact with fashion week through live shopping experiences and interactive events. Consumers will also be able to use the ‘See-Now-Buy-Now’ tech at a number of shows giving them the ability to shop the collections from their couch.

The week kicks off with Afterpay’s Dropshop located in Times Square, combining Snapchat technology with the Dropshop concept. Launched in April, Dropshop allows Afterpay customers early access to purchase limited edition collections, with virtual try-ons through the use of Snapchat augmented reality. Afterpay will be bringing the concept to the streets of New York, with a physical shopping event in a Dropshop way.

Throughout the course of NYFW and beyond, consumers can also attend the House of Afterpay, a pop-up store with a number of exclusive products on offer. It will also be home to educational talks and styling workshops, designed to get the consumer involved in the retail experience. Other events will include celebrity styling sessions, an Empire State Building light change and an Afterpay after party.

Co-founder and co-CEO of Afterpay Nick Molnar said in a statement: “This September, Afterpay is championing the city that never sleeps, igniting New York City retail and opening fashion to the consumer in a way that has never been done before. With a week of interactive events, Afterpay is proud to support New York City’s economy and jumpstart a fresh future for the fashion industry across the globe.”

Source: Fashion United

Authentic Brands Group to acquire Reebok

Adidas has sold sportswear brand Reebok to Authentic Brands Group (ABG) “for a total consideration of up to 2.1 billion euros” with the deal expected to close in the first quarter of 2022.

The German sportswear giant said in a statement that ABG would pay the majority in cash at closing of the transaction and the remainder comprised of deferred and contingent consideration. Adidas adding that it will share the majority of the cash proceeds with its shareholders.

Kasper Rorsted chief executive of Adidas AG said: “Reebok has been a valued part of Adidas, and we are grateful for the contributions the brand and the team behind it have made to our company.

“With this change in ownership, we believe the Reebok brand will be well-positioned for long-term success. As for adidas, we will continue to focus our efforts on executing our ‘Own the Game’ strategy that will enable us to grow in an attractive industry, gain market share, and create sustainable value for all of our stakeholders.”

Adidas acquired Reebok in 2006, which at the time included the Rockport, CCM Hockey and Greg Norman brands that the sportswear brand later offloaded. In 2016, Reebok initiated a turnaround plan called ‘Muscle Up’ to significantly improve its growth and profitability prospects, and following an evaluation from Adidas, it confirmed in February 2021 that it would sell Reebok as part of its ongoing efforts to strengthen the Adidas brand globally.

Adidas sells Reebok to Authentic Brands Group

ABG will own and manage the intellectual property of Reebok and plans to “employ its core playbook, connecting strong brands with best-in-class licensees and a network of partners that seek to optimise value in the marketplace”.

Reebok’s world headquarters will remain in Boston and ABG will work closely with Adidas, Reebok’s president Matt O’Toole and the entire Reebok team to transition the brand to ABG’s platform. Reebok’s operations will continue in the US and Canada, Latin America, Asia Pacific, Europe and Russia.

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Image: courtesy of ABG/Reebok

Jamie Salter, founder, chairman and chief executive of ABG, said: “We’ve had our sights set on Reebok for many years, and we’re excited to finally bring this iconic brand into the fold. Reebok not only holds a special place in the minds and hearts of consumers around the world, but the brand also has expansive global distribution.

“Adidas has been an incredible steward of the Reebok brand, and we look forward to working with the Reebok team to continue their great work and further its position as one of the world’s leading consumer brands.”

Reebok currently operates in 80 countries, with approximately 70 percent of its business hailing from outside of the US and Canada, and ABG has stated that its goal is to maintain the brand’s global footprint across retail, wholesale and e-commerce channels.

ABG, a brand development, marketing and entertainment company, recently acquired US outdoor brand Eddie Bauer with retail enterprise SPARC Group and snapped up Barneys New York and Brooks Brothers. Other brands in its portfolio include Juicy Couture, Forever 21, Spyder, Greg Norman, Aéropostale and Volcom.

Source: Fashion United

34 Sustainability efforts of the fashion industry in July 2021

In July, there was no sign of the hot summer weather slowing down the fashion industry’s sustainability efforts. On the contrary, there were collaborations galore be it in terms of recycling, resale, sustainable collections or material innovations. In addition, many brands published their accelerated sustainability goals or reaching of targets in terms of plastic, carbon and energy reduction. This month, FashionUnited is highlighting 35 sustainable initiatives that were presented in July 2021.

Collaborations and projects

1. ThredUp and electronics giant LG team up for clothing clean-out program

US fashion resale platform ThredUp has teamed up with LG Electronics USA, a subsidiary of South Korean electronics giant LG, to launch a charitable apparel clean-out program.

2. Madewell teams up with ThredUp for second-hand denim platform

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Image: Madewell

US denim brand Madewell has launched a new second-hand fashion platform with the help of resale giant ThredUp. The new platform, called ‘Madewell Forever’, harnesses ThredUp’s resale-as-a-service (RaaS) to give preloved women’s jeans a new lease of life.

3. Dotte launches resale collective with leading childrenswear brands

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Image: courtesy of Dotte

Dotte, a fashion-forward peer-to-peer marketplace, has launched the Dotte Resale Collective with leading childrenswear brands including Tobias and the Bear and Turtledove London.

4. Fila collaborates with Oliver Spencer on a sustainable collection

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Image: courtesy of Fila x Oliver Spencer by Rankin

Sportswear brand Fila is launching a sustainably produced collection with British menswear designer Oliver Spencer. The collection features a range of vintage sportswear silhouettes in rich colours and luxury fabrics that have been ecologically sourced and responsibly made.

5. Adidas invests in Spinnova, a Finnish textile recycling company

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Image: Spinnova

Adidas is investing 3 million euros in Spinnova, a Finnish sustainable textile company that makes textile fibre out of wood or agricultural waste. The company aims to make cellulose-based materials cost-efficient, environmentally friendly and a preferred manufacturing option for brands.

6. Gucci invests in sustainable supply chain with Intesa Sanpaolo bank

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Image: Kering, Facebook

Source: Fashion United

10 figures that illustrate the 2021 resale fashion market

Brands and retailers alike have embraced the resale market, from fast fashion labels launching their own platforms to luxury houses setting their goals toward a more conscious future. Their common point? Using resale initiatives to boost their sustainability credentials – H&M being the latest to do so with a marketplace launching 7 September in Canada as reported by Bof. FashionUnited has gathered the 10 key figures you need to understand the current state of the resale fashion market.

$1.6 billion

Brooklyn-based company Etsy, which specialises in handmade and vintage items, bought British second-hand fashion resale app for $1.6 billion back in June. The sale highlights an ever-growing demand, putting the American company in the spotlight of Generation Z consumers – the ones leading the sales of second-hand items.

33 million

The total number of consumers who bought second-hand apparel for the first time in 2020. The pandemic confirmed a shift in the way people buy clothes and accessories alike: they’re now, more than ever, open to buying pre-owned items. The number of first-time buyers over the last year is testament to it.

65%

Consumers turn to second-hand fashion for many different reasons, whether it be their personal style, budget or commitment to a more sustainable lifestyle. According to a joint report between Bain & Co. and Depop, 65 percent of users choose to buy pre-loved items for the prices, which are – usually – lower than the ones at retail stores.

75%

However, in the same report by Bain & Co. and Depop, 75 percent of the users who were surveyed admitted that the main reason they shopped second-hand was to reduce general fashion consumption. It’s important to note that 90 percent of them were under 25, which highlights a growing awareness in the younger age groups.

101.2 million

The number of clothing items that were sold by retailers in resale shops in the course of the year 2020. Though it seems promising, the downside is that only 560k of all the garments were actually second-hand.

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American second-hand online store ThreadUp conducted a report in partnership with market research firm GlobalData, which highlights the state of the resale market post-pandemic. It projected that it’s meant to double in the next five years, reaching a total of 77 billion dollar. Indeed, 188 million consumers have tried reselling for the first time in 2021, compared to 36.2 million in 2020.

$84 billion

The same report by ThreadUp put forward the fact that the resale fashion market is currently growing at a rate that’s 11 times faster than traditional retail. It should be worth 84 billion dollar by 2030, while fast fashion is predicted to be worth about 40 billion dollar. The next decade will therefore see the second-hand market grow much faster than traditional retail, as it’s supposed to be twice the size of fast fashion by 2030.

5 to 7%

Business of Fashion explained in one of its Insights reports that only 5 to 7 percent of resaleable fashion is sold and bought on resale platforms at the moment. It means that there’s an estimated 2.1 trillion dollar of fashion items currently sitting in wardrobes that are not being used.

60%

ThreadUp’s report showcased that 60 percent of the retailers surveyed have or are now open to offering a range of second-hand items to their customers. While consumers seem more and more appealed to previously-owned items, retailers are also more interested in taking part in positive change for the future.

82%

Finally, let’s not forget about another major positive impact: consumers reduce their carbon footprint by 82 percent when they buy used items instead of new ones.

Source: Fashion United